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  1. #16
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    You realise radiators for these things new are in the region of $120 to the trade. Around $140 -$160 retail

  2. #17
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    wow, that's cheap. Wish they were that price here new.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by HQ 368 View Post
    You realise radiators for these things new are in the region of $120 to the trade. Around $140 -$160 retail
    Yeah I do mark but I thought as I had a copper one from the vl which was less than 6 months old it maybe worth using that ?

    Maybe I am overthinking it though mate ?

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryan350 View Post
    Yeah I do mark but I thought as I had a copper one from the vl which was less than 6 months old it maybe worth using that ?

    Maybe I am overthinking it though mate ?
    Pretty sure they wont fit.
    If you try and make it fit make sure that nothing grounds the radiator.

    The alloy radiators are so much better than the copper brass ones efficiency wise.

  5. #20
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    Have to disagree with the ground issue. The rad should be grounded, & preferably to the bat [-] terminal. When I had my alum rad custom built 20 yrs ago, I had a lug welded on so that I could run a wire from the rad to bat. If the rad 'floats' [ above electrical ground ], there is a potential difference [ voltage ] between the rad & engine, & a stray current flows which causes corrosion & failure of the rad. Also, only Distilled, Demineralised or RO [ reverse osmosis ] water should be used to prevent corrosion.

    To test for stray current, you need an analog volt meter, on millivolts scale. Place the neg lead on the bat [-] terminal. Place the [+] probe in the coolant, not touching metal. Over 50 mV is too much, zero is best.
    I know of a VW that was repaired after an accident & the rad corroded away in 3m because a grd strap was left off.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by HQ 368 View Post
    Pretty sure they wont fit.
    If you try and make it fit make sure that nothing grounds the radiator.

    The alloy radiators are so much better than the copper brass ones efficiency wise.

    Cheers mark , I think just buying a new radiator like you suggested is the smartest route!

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by GtoGeoff View Post
    Have to disagree with the ground issue. The rad should be grounded, & preferably to the bat [-] terminal. When I had my alum rad custom built 20 yrs ago, I had a lug welded on so that I could run a wire from the rad to bat. If the rad 'floats' [ above electrical ground ], there is a potential difference [ voltage ] between the rad & engine, & a stray current flows which causes corrosion & failure of the rad. Also, only Distilled, Demineralised or RO [ reverse osmosis ] water should be used to prevent corrosion.

    To test for stray current, you need an analog volt meter, on millivolts scale. Place the neg lead on the bat [-] terminal. Place the [+] probe in the coolant, not touching metal. Over 50 mV is too much, zero is best.
    I know of a VW that was repaired after an accident & the rad corroded away in 3m because a grd strap was left off.
    Sorry mate, you ground an alloy radiator you kill it.
    A few minutes research and you'll see why, you do not want to encourage any electrical activity in the cooling system. No different to any other form of electrolysis.
    That's why manufacturers went away from mounting radiators to panels decades ago.

    Copper/Brass radiators are not so bad but the glycol and corrosion inhibitors have changed the game somewhat when it comes to alloy.

    You can use an anode for security if you want to stick to your guns.
    Last edited by HQ 368; 16-01-2021 at 10:57 PM.

  8. #23
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    HQ,

    With respect some of your info is incorrect. My car is driven weekly, has had an alum rad for 20 yrs with a grd strap & has no corrosion at all. The reason radiators were moved from direct mount 'decades ago' was that they were copper/brass which are held together with soft lead/tin solder. Not welded/brazed/crimped like alum rads. The soldered rads cannot withstand a lot of shock/vibration & would crack/leak; & so were often mounted with rubber. The orig rad in my GTO is mounted on rubber cushions.

    You are 100% correct that you do not want to encourage electrical activity in the cooling system. To have electrical activity, you need voltage [ potential difference ]. Voltage produces current flow; no voltage, no current flow. Current flow is a flow of electrons, electrolysis, which causes the corrosion. By ensuring the rad & engine are at the same potential [ zero, because they are connected to a common point, ground ] there is no current flow through the coolant.



    That is what the test in post #20 does, it is checking for potential difference [ voltage ]. That test & the other info was in a tech bulletin given to me by the rad builder & comes from Calsonic Aust, radiator manufacturer. Also states this [ about the stray current test, post #20 ]: "ANY voltage reading indicates the presence of current passing through the coolant-thus meaning electrolysis [ stray current ] is occurring." [ Emphasis in original ]. It is also most important to check that all electrical components are properly grounded to reduce stray currents. Don't know if Calsonic are still around...

  9. #24
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    97 is within normal operating range. My vs has always run at around 95-105 degrees with the A/C on with 82 deg thermostat. They have a tiny radiator for the 304 compared to the H series etc.

    Normal driving without a/c on a mild day would see it around 85-90.

  10. #25
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    Sorry Geoff, your assumptions are incorrect.

    I have been doing root cause analysis for vehicle manufacturers for well over 30 years.
    Recently I have been doing a lot of work on cooling systems and heat exchangers for what I would consider premature failure, can't mention the name of manufacturer on this.

    Some of the chemicals in additives activate while they are decaying, pH balance can cause problems, induced voltages are a concern and there are many other chemical factors.
    The current is always there, it's just a matter of how much.

    You'd be amazed at some of the things we find. I have certainly been blown away over the years from the things we have found.
    A little bit of Sulpher in an additive package stopped Land Rover bringing a particular model (I cant mention the model) into the country during the naughtie's, that would go so far as to take out the transmission and the vehicle ECU in many cases.

  11. #26
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    On the original question:

    At some time north of 300,000km, even with all the recommended maintenance, all the cooling system on these tends to give up the ghost. I’m going to suggest replacing the water pump, radiator and all hoses. They just tend to reach the end of their service life.

    Now I know someone will come on and tell me they ran their car for half a million clicks and had no problems and others will say that they only got 120,000 out of their system. I’m not dismissing these experiences it’s been my observation that they need a big refresh at around that mark.

  12. #27
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    I put the genuine Holden thermostat while they were still available in my car, originally had none in it when I got it, was sitting on 65 degrees on scan tool.

    Put the genuine Holden one in it, sits on 79-82 degrees on the highway, will get to 92 in in traffic and if its warm ambient temps it'll go up to 97 in traffic.

    Unfortunately my commute is 95% highway and 5% suburbia so it doesn't get to sit in traffic much and since the A/C doesn't work I don't drive it in warm weather lol

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