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  1. #1
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    Default Jacko's HT Monaro thread

    I would like to post my build journal here but it will not let me copy from Word and paste. Is there something I am doing wrong?

  2. #2
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    OK, delete to my question. It appears you cannot paste into a new thread. Probably to stop autospam bots or aliens or something...

  3. #3
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    OK, I started this build a while back and have decided to post the progress after reading a few of the builds on here. Felt like a bit of a voyeur really as I could be contributing myself, so here goes...

    The car started as an orange (closest thing they had to Red) 253 4spd GTS. I am the fifth owner with the PO owning it since the early 1980's. The car is local to Canberra and is distinctive as it has a dealer-fitted Webasto sunroof. There was another sebring orange Monaro kicking around Canberra at the same time but that did not have the sunroof (and he lived on the south side). The PO did some rust repairs, built the current motor, a small block chev 350, and made no bones about the fact he drove the car pretty hard and it went like the clappers. I got the impression the PO liked the odd street race or two.

    PO painted the car black in the mid '80's and there was clearly an issue as it is mostly delaminating (that is a traddie term meaning 'peeling off'). At that time they fixed up some rust in the floor and a couple of the panels; driver’s side under the quarter for example.

    PO and car appeared in a magazine back in the early 1980’s. Why a Monaro- I think they look good.

    Car appeared in a magazine back in the early 1980’s



    Towed to home by Mick and his 4WD on Friday 15 May 2015

    16 May: Car driven down driveway and placed on ramps. Two cans of degreaser and the pressure washer used to clean engine bay and underneath.










    17 May: Photos taken of underside. Huge huntsman spider frightens me from under the car, hitting head, jamming shoulder on sill and basically getting in a human tangle while trying to escape the attacking spider (did I mention I find eight eyes rather scary).

    Cheers
    Jacko

  4. #4
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    23 May: remove two fronts seats, front and rear carpet. Floor has three rust repairs (well that is what I thought at the time) that are braised.

    Removed front and rear trim/door cards. Handles held on via spring clips that Les gave me the remover for- not sure how you would get these off otherwise. Quite evident the original colour was Sebring orange.







    Greased window winders and they seem to free-up nicely. Top of the doors only comes off after windows have been removed- doh!

    24 May: remove gearbox and clutch slave cylinder. Cleaned slave cylinder up so it works and now looks like new. Major bummer- left it for a few days and the thing leaks.



    Here you can see the slave to bellhousing bracket. Clearances are tight with the headers. Not really sure what the bolt toward the top is doing. I think it might be a little long and the PO just has not changed it for the correct length OR the car is missing something.





    Note of work done to gearbox from PO: “I had pulled it down as 2nd gear synchro was causing problems. That I believe was in 88/89 Bearings and synchro were replaced.”

    In the week following: order and received the HT supplement, FiL gave me the HK manual, ordered and received the Max Elery HK/T manual.

    Removed boot liner, fuel tank side plates that cover the tank,



    To reveal five golf balls and a golf tee. This is the rare golfing option fitted to this car:





    Scraped off dirt and grime from rear inner guards. Vacuumed rubbish and dirt out of interior. Jackson, grandson, fits nicely in the boot and gave me a hand to unscrew bits and hold things.

  5. #5
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    had to split the post as it does not like more than 10 images:

    With the rest of the gear changing bits out, I disconnected the clutch pedal from the shaft and removed the clutch master cylinder from the firewall.






    The thing is a bit rusty



    A closer look revealed a few years of gunk and sludge- not standard lubrication





    This was an indication that a simple kero bath and new seal were unlikely to be enough to get it going again. I think a resleeve is in order and dropped it off to the place in Queanbeyan.

  6. #6
    Do you ever leave? Hqtunna4me's Avatar
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    Nice to see another build thread. Also good to see another canberra car, i live northside but i suspect ive spoken to you at the Rj's meet on a friday in woden. I have a HK wagon.
    A minute of thinking can save hours of doing

  7. #7
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    What a find!! Was it still rego'd or living in a shed?

  8. #8
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    Hq I think you might be right re RJs, usually bring one of those other brands along. Pity those meets faded away.

    75, it had been in a shed for 20 odd years. I am actually trying to track down the first owner so if anyone knows of an orange HT 253 4spd with a sunroof that was in Canberra in the early 1970's please let me know.

  9. #9
    Do you ever leave? Hqtunna4me's Avatar
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    Most people head up to the Gspot in gungahlin or they had a few meets over in Erindale, but i dont think that lasted.
    A minute of thinking can save hours of doing

  10. #10
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    Good thread thanks refreshing

  11. #11
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    9 June
    Collected re-sleeved clutch master cylinder. Dropped off slave cylinder for re-sleeving. Collected it a few days later. Here is a shot of the slave and master clutch cylinders:



    In the week that followed: spoke to a few people who confirmed underbody colour and various bits and pieces. Via another site, got hold of the Holden Historical Society. They stated the VIN suggested the car was made in the second week of August 1969.

    They also stated that if it was a genuine 253 car it should have a ‘Saginaw linkage clearance hump’ on the passenger side of the trans tunnel where their right foot would go. Jumped into the car to search for a ‘hump’ and viola- found it. This same person noted that all V8 GTS cars had the radius rods fitted to the diff; these were anchored in the wheel well and there should be a plate with two bolts inside the car. Checked for these and she has them- this car is beginning to reveal that she is indeed a GTS- God bless Brendan.

    Here is the ‘hump’, on the left side of the tunnel:



    And here is the bracket



    Since removing the gearbox and shifter, I cleaned the shifter and linkages and found the reverse detent button was the issue causing the ‘slap it into reverse’ syndrome. When he said ‘slap’ he really meant ‘flog it’ into reverse. Now, the reverse button thing is not a very common item and a visit to a couple of transmission ‘specialists’ could not even ID what the thing was. Here is a photo of the shifter and below it the suspect detent button:








    Googling found a spare in the US for USD120. As Rare Spares make new shifters someone must make the thing at an affordable price- they must but I couldn’t find them.

    Here is how the detent button works:




    Essentially, the large spring goes in the big piston to push the larger assembled piston away from the base.

    The other spring goes in the bottom of the smaller piston (as it is oriented in the photo) and the larger ball bearing sits on top of it. While depressing the large ball against the spring, the four smaller ball bearings (there are four I left one out of the shot) are inserted so they align with the holes in the side of the piston while ensuring they do not fly out the holes- we used a stiff bit of plastic as a collar.

    You then carefully up-end the smaller assembled piston and insert it into the other bit and push it down until the small ball bearings seat in the internal groove. The big ball bearing pushes (via the spring it sits on) the smaller ball bearings out so they seat in the groove. The action of the shifter lever selecting reverse pushes against the head of the small piston sufficient to over-come the large ball bearing keeping the smaller ball bearings 'expanded' in the internal groove. It then moves down the bore until reverse is deselected and the big spring pushes the piston back up and the smaller ball bearings seat in the internal groove.

    I fluked getting it apart in the first instance by 'bouncing' a hammer on the small piston so that the velocity of it returning happened to be enough for the smaller ball bearings to continue through the outer edge of the internal groove. A quick search for the ball bearings and walla - I had it apart.



    Ordered a new shifter and gearbox mount (that happens to be the same up to VL). The shifter arrived a few days later. Fitted the lever and reverse is a hell of a lot easier to select and it feels generally tighter, suggesting the shafts on the original were well worn.

  12. #12
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    11 June
    Purchased a new wire cone and began cleaning the gearbox. Noticed one of the shifter bars (that connect the rods to the gearbox) is cracked across. Ian C suggested grooving the crack and welding- will give this a go.



    While cleaning the box, noticed the gasket was covering the transmission code plate; I had previously thought this milled surface was blank- but no. Noted the code started with what I thought was a P and set about decoding it further. Unfortunately, the decoding did not make any sense as it came up as a Muncie and I am confident the box is a Saginaw. After a few minutes pondering what was happening, reviewed the photos and saw the little leg of an R on the P. Changing the P to an R made perfect sense and the box decoded correctly as a Saginaw 4spd made on 9 May 1969.

  13. #13
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    14 June (journal time)
    Sunday
    Great winters day to get he covers off and resume dismantling. With Jackson in the boot holding the bolt head with a spanner (he fits easily), we removed the tow bar. The rattle gun makes this sort of thing so much easier and faster. Disconnected the wiring for the tow bar from the loom and removed the lot.

    Disconnected the rear tail lights from the housings and unplugged this section of the lock. The number plate bracket (a rubber press through grommet arrangement) was not going to come off easily and I had to remove the brown wire from the multi-pin plug to get it off the rear bumper. I left the boot lamp switch and lamp in place as I did not want to cut the wire leading to these –there is no connector I could find and the power wire disappears up in the roof somewhere (near the rear drivers side courtesy lamp I think).

    I used a stanley knife to score the sealant from around the rear tail light housings while Jackson undid the four retaining bolts. Had to show him how to use the magnetic pick-up thingy as we dropped a little nut in the wheel arch. Both tail lights removed without further issue and pleased as these look in pretty good nic.

    With the lights out, access into the void in the panels below revealed a golf tee and marker holder thingy that must have been there for years. I could not see it with the assembly in place. Jackson used his new found magnetic extension device to grab the wire loop and carefully remove this artefact from its hidey-hole. Cleaned out more sand/dirt from the drivers side area back from the wheel arch. With the tail light out this was much easier as I could use a long screw driver through the tail light hole.

    From underneath this area of the car (drivers side wheel arch) it was evident it had taken a hit/scrap here at some stage and what should have been a nice circular curve was looking decidedly flat. Thor’s hammer obtained (a 2lb hammer and a length of timber) for some remedial (or rudimentary) panel work. A few firm but well placed hits saw the panel resume its ‘happy shape’. This opened up the area under the wheel spacer thingy sufficient to reveal more fine dirt/sand, the drain hole for said dirt and a .22 calibre bullet. Bit interesting to find nowadays but not too surprising when you consider that gun ownership was not unusual back in the 1970’s.



    More dirt and crap cleaned out from the drivers side wheel arch and tail light area such that it is now looking cleaner and not like the bottom of a potters wheel. No signs of the dreaded rust.

    With access to the bumper now easier, Jackson again helped remove the side bolts (the ones hidden in the wheel arch side panels) that hold on the rear bumper. With these out, the rattle gun made short work of the remaining four bolts securing the rear bumper to the end of the chassis rails. Bumper off and safely wrapped in a doona cover for protection. Looks pretty straight.

    To round out the rear dismantling, I removed the four phillips head screws holding on the fuel filler bib- not sure what else to call it.




    With the rear dismantled, it was time to relocate operations to the front. Started dismantling the front with the side front markers. Only interesting thing here was that the passenger side had the rubber grommet installed from the rear as opposed to the front, where I suspect it should have been. Disconnected them from the loom via the plugs.





    Lenses look to be in good condition, as does the chrome on the housings. Oddly, the PO threw in another three (yep not two pairs) housings but no further lenses.

    Hood catch assembly removed to allow access to the uprights holding in the grill.



    Well this happened to be connected to just about everything else on the front, including the top radiator support and lower valence. Removed the bolts securing the top support thinking this would make access easier- wrong. It appears the radiator needs to come out to make all this easier. But as I did not want to remove it just yet I had to work around it.






    Removed the row of bolts securing the lower valance and got this out the way. This allowed access to the little pot bolts holding the number plate in place. Lot of trouble to go to to mount this sucker I tell you. As it turns out, these plates have been reissued twice since this car. They now reside on a nice HQ coupe that is owned by a good guy and his family.

    Decided to remove the front bumper with mounting arms and all. It is held on by two bolts through the guards on each side and two plates/arms that protrude back and mount to the sides of the chassis rails. But that bloody radiator prevented complete removal of two bolt holding the chassis rails plates on. Managed to insert them just enough to clear the plates/arms and the front bumper pulled out nicely. All wrapped and secured under the house.

    After disconnecting the head light wiring loom, removed the head lights, adjusting plastic clips (they push through a square hole and provide the thread for the long adjusting bolt), washer bottle and a small plastic loom clip from the drivers side inner fender. Disconnected the bumper arms from the bumper before I wrapped it to make storage easier. A good days dismantling.


  14. #14
    Do you ever leave? Hqtunna4me's Avatar
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    Good write up mate, keen to see some more pics.
    A minute of thinking can save hours of doing

  15. #15
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    15 June The heater

    The heater on these is mounted in the engine bay inside a heater box. A bit more accessible than the mustang but a lot less visually appealing in the engine bay. The box is made out of some form of fibrous bakerlite/come fibreglass. As mine has a few cracks and holes, my fibre glassing skills would get a work out.



    Drained the coolant (that I added to replace the water) from the radiator and motor. Saved most of it with the other two litres being soaked into my shoes.

    Removed the heater hoses and routed one back to the water pump- just in case I want to start it. Used the hose pliers, that push the hose away from the tube and got to say I love them. They saved a heap of twisting, tugging and grief.

    With the heater hoses disconnected and the brown power wire free, I undid the four phillips head screws along the top of the heater box. The metre long screw driver from the mustang dash rebuild came in quiet handy here. Then realised I needed to jump inside the car and disconnect the heater distribution unit that is attached to the four long bolts from the heater unit through the firewall. Nuts off and the heater box pulled away easily.

    Here is the space it frees up. I have seen in some earlier cars there is a blanking plate where the heater box goes.

    cars

    And the unit freed






    Great to find a white inspection stamp on the base of the heater box for 26 Jul 1969. A closer look at the heater box reveals a bit of damage but the core looks fine. I sense some quality fibre glassing time approaching.




    To completely remove the plastic air distribution unit out from under the dash, I pulled off the air vent hoses but she still would not come free. Then located a sly screw on the drivers side end of the unit that was keeping it in place. Undid this and disconnected the wire control cable and she was out. This looks to be in really great condition.



    As I was underish the dash- argh, my not so favourite place- I took a few snaps of the wire connections and other assorted bits I as yet do not realise I have, or need to remove.

    Inside the workshop, removed the badges from the grill (the lion and GTS). The lion surround appears to be blue but is pretty faded. What was a red GTS is now just a pot metal silver.

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